The buzz of bees in Paris

The buzz of bees in Paris. Why did Napoleon love bees? He loved them so much that the bee became his signature emblem. It is said that bees were his symbol of tenacity. But bees are now very much a Parisian motif. Scientists from the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA-France) – the National InstituteContinue reading “The buzz of bees in Paris”

The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his good Theresa

The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his good Theresa.  The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau is the autobiography of writer, composer, and philosopher Rousseau (1712-1778), written in 1782.  Born in Geneva, his mother died in childbirth, and his watchmaker father raised him until the age of ten. From ten to sixteen years of age, he livedContinue reading “The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and his good Theresa”

Félix Potin building in Paris: renovated and revealed

Félix Potin building in Paris: renovated and revealed. In October 2013, the Félix Potin turret was under wraps. Today the Félix Potin building has been renovated and revealed.  The Félix Potin building is on the rue de Rennes in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. Rue de Rennes was originally designed to connect the Gare Montparnasse (theContinue reading “Félix Potin building in Paris: renovated and revealed”

French Asterix comics

French Asterix comics. The Asterix comics are quintessentially French. Its co-creator, Albert Uderzo, who teamed with Rene Goscinny to create Gaul Asterix (the character with the moustache), died this year in Paris on Tuesday 24 March 2020, aged 92 from heart failure.  Albert Uderzo was born on 25 April 1927 in Fismes, in eastern France. HeContinue reading “French Asterix comics”

Marie Curie Museum in Paris: a woman of science

Marie Curie Museum in Paris: a woman of science.  The Curie Museum in Paris is the laboratory museum of Marie and Pierre Curie, where they conducted physics and chemistry research from 1900-1930s, particularly in the study of radium and cancer research.  Before the laboratory was built, Marie Curie (1867-1934) and her husband Pierre (1859-1906) hadContinue reading “Marie Curie Museum in Paris: a woman of science”

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas in Paris – just around the corner

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas in Paris– just around the corner. American author Gertrude Stein lived in Paris. She followed her brother Leo to London in 1902 when she was twenty-eight years old. She had lived in Paris before, but only as a three- and four-year-old with her parents, before the family returned toContinue reading “Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas in Paris – just around the corner”

Claude Monet and his Water Lilies

Claude Monet and his Water Lilies. Water Lilies is not one painting. It is a series of paintings that French Impressionist Oscar-Claude Monet (1840-1926) worked on for thirty years, inspired by the water garden at his home in Giverny in Normandy. He created about 300 paintings of water lilies, with about forty in large format.Continue reading “Claude Monet and his Water Lilies”

Parisian architecture: ‘castles in the air’

Parisian architecture: ‘castles in the air.’  In May 2015, the mayor of Paris Anne Hidalgo, wrote an article in Politico stating that the French capital has become a testing ground for new technologies. She headlined the article, in English, ‘Parisian castles in the air.’ It is an interesting headline. France is famous for its castles –Continue reading “Parisian architecture: ‘castles in the air’”

For the Parisian love of carousels

For the Parisian love of carousels. The French love the carousel, the merry-go-round: le carrousel, la manège. And I love them too.  The turning-rides and round-abouts may have been around since Roman times, but the English word ‘carousel’ originated from the French word. It originated from an eccentric 18th century Frenchman, Guillaume Joseph Roussel (1743-1807), known asContinue reading “For the Parisian love of carousels”